10 WAYS TO TRAIN YOUR BRAIN TO BE OPTIMISTIC

While some people appear to be more positive than others, it doesn’t mean that you cannot train yourself to approach life more optimistically. Practicing optimism often means creating practices around optimistic thinking. By focusing on your thoughts and mental patterns, you can begin to retrain yourself to think more positively and optimistically and learn new patterns of thought. Spend less time engaging negative thoughts and instead, replace them with positive or more helpful thoughts. Over time, you can train yourself to approach situations more positively and optimistically.

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SURPRISING FOODS TO COMBAT COLDS

As temperatures start to drop, the chances of catching a cold start to rise. And as we enter the holiday season, illness is one thing we can certainly do without. Keeping our immune system in tip-top shape becomes even more crucial during this time of the year as our natural defense against those pesky germs.

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Are Omega-3s Worth the Money? Yes!

Consumers worldwide spend more than $30 billion a year on omega-3 products and supplements, according to Packaged Facts, a consumer market research company. In surveys of 10,000 frequent supplement users conducted by ConsumerLab.com, fish oil pills—fish oil is high in omega-3 fatty acids—were the most frequently bought supplement product.

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WHICH IS BETTER FOR YOUR HEART: BEEF OR CHICKEN?

The average American diet includes 8 oz. of meat each day, twice the world’s average, according to “The New York Times.” If you have concerns about heart disease, the number one health problem in the U.S., restricting your consumption of meat is important. Each time you make a choice between chicken or beef, ensuring you choose the right one may make an impact over time. Several nutrients in both meat types identify the healthiest one for heart health.

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HEART RATE, EXERCISE & AGE

Heart rate and age are necessary components in estimating your heart’s response to exercise. Heart rate is the number of times your heart beats per minute. The age-adjusted equation for estimating your maximum heart rate is 220 minus your age. The product of this equation is used to determine your heart rate at a given intensity level, expressed as a percentage of your maximum heart rate.

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